Your Daily Cry: Fleury Pens Emotional Goodbye

The Player's Tribute is a website familiar to many Penguins fans.  With articles from Jake Guentzel, Pascal Dupuis, and Mike Lange it's offered a look inside the mind of our favorite players and personalities.  Now comes Marc-Andre Fleury with his turn to make us ugly face cry.


If you thought you were done with the feels over Marc-Andre Fleury's departure, he comes along to tell you that you're wrong and you're about to cry at work with his article "Thank You, Pittsburgh."

Starting off with the tale of his draft bringing things full circle for his time in Pittsburgh, he gives us a peak in to what was in his mind during the last two rounds for the Stanley Cup Playoffs:
I wish I could have been in net for my last game as a Penguin. But we raised the Cup, again, and it made all the sacrifices worthy. I felt proud — proud of my teammates for battling through injuries, for showing a lot of character, and for winning two years in a row. I am grateful that I had the chance to contribute to our success through the first rounds. And I feel very fortunate that the last time I have skated with a Penguins jersey, it will have been with the Stanley Cup in my hands. Not that it wasn’t an emotional moment.
He goes on to praise Mario Lemieux for the human we know him to be both on and off the ice:
 I remember the first time I stopped Mario in practice. It was a simple warmup shot. But you better believe that I kept that puck — and still have it at home. Mario is a great role model for me — his loyalty to the team, his contributions to the community, how he handles himself and how he and Nathalie raised four great, humble kids. I’ll always be thankful for their support throughout the years.
Tells us an anecdote about his first game in the NHL:
My first home game was against the Kings at the Igloo on Oct. 10, 2003. My dream was becoming a reality. Maybe the excitement was a little high. So high, that, well … I forgot something. As everybody was getting ready to head out of the locker room, I made my way towards the ice, fist bumped a few guys (including Marc Bergevin and Mario) and then I realized that I had forgotten my stick. It was a pretty funny walk of shame past all my teammates to go grab my stick.  As I was walking back, Mario cracked a little smile and said “You’re going to need that tonight, kid.”
Recalls fondly his, perhaps, finest moment as a Pittsburgh Penguin:
Game 7 of the 2009 finals in Detroit is without a doubt one of my favorite moments as a Penguin. Seeing my good friend Max Talbot score two huge goals for us was incredible. And then, of course, making that save against Lidstrom in the last seconds was something I will never forget. I proudly sported a deep bruise on my ribs from that save for weeks following that game. I’ll always remember my teammates jumping on the ice, racing toward me with the biggest smiles. The feeling of winning the Stanley Cup that night is indescribable.
And waxes poetic on how the Penguins fans helped turn around a rough start to his season this past year:
One of my best memories is from earlier this season, actually. We had just been on a road trip and it was our first game back home against Tampa Bay. I had been struggling a bit. I couldn’t buy a save, and I wasn’t feeling great about it. Everybody was getting ready for the anthem, and the crowd started chanting my name. It made no sense. I wasn’t playing well. The game hadn’t even started yet. But they were behind me anyway. 
Fleu-ry, Fleu-ry. 
Maybe they could sense that I was feeling a little down, and I needed it. We ended up winning the game, things turned around for me, and I ended up having a great season. That moment was the turning point, and it was because of our fans. 
These are but a few of the stories, words, and tales told in Marc's emotional goodbye to the friends, family and fans he made over 14 years in Pittsburgh.  Read it, take it in, love him even more.  Just do so at your own peril.  Your make up may run, your eyes will get misty, and you'll be crying at your desk when you do.
 
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About Nick C.

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1 comments:

  1. It is sad that money destroys loyalty and kindness.

    ReplyDelete